Start typing to see products you are looking for.
  • Menu Menu
  • Categories Categories

Shopping cart

Close

News News

News News

History of Sex Toys Ⅱ----Vibrators History of Sex Toys Ⅱ----Vibrators

As early as 45 B.C., Cleopatra invented a primitive vibrator. She hollowed out the inside of the gourd and imprisoned a troop of bees inside. The bees danced around inside the gourd, turning it into a vibrator.
 
China's Ming Dynasty, when a popular sex toy called "Maine bell," which is shaped like a ball, hollow inside, containing mercury or other rolling items, outside wrapped in gold or silver. When the bell comes in contact with the body, it vibrates by itself.
It is somewhat similar to today's kegel balls.
During the Victorian era, many women suffered from "hysteria". Derived from the Greek word for "overactive womb," symptoms included anxiety, irritability, sexual fantasies, pelvic heaviness, and excessive vaginal discharge. Because this was the Victorian era, women were not considered to be in need of sex, so it was considered a disease.
Initially, in order to treat "female hysteria," doctors in the U.S. and England used "hydrotherapy massage," or jets of water to help patients release their "emotions.
Later, "manual pelvic massage" began to be used as a popular treatment. However, many severe patients had to undergo up to an hour of treatment before their symptoms subsided, causing many physicians to experience hand cramps.

 

In the 1850s, in order to free the hands of doctors, some visionaries invented the first mechanical vibrators. Some wise men invented the first generation of mechanical vibrators, which had an innovative hand-crank design. However, while the vibrator increased efficiency, it was still dependent on manual labor, and doctors still had to endure sore arms.

In 1869, a physician named George Taylor invented the Steam Vibrator. The vibrator consisted of a steam engine and a massage bed with a hole in the bed that served as a communication channel between the patient and the steam engine under the bed. Doctors didn't like the machine because they couldn't take it to patients' homes, and they hated shoveling coal into it.
In 1882, the first electronic oscillators were battery-operated massagers invented by English physician Joseph Mortimer Granville, configured with a toolbox similar to today's massagers, allowing physicians to treat hysteria with a variety of lengths and intensities of vibratory sensations.  Granville's electric vibrator was more portable, though. But in order to drive the machine, you still had to bring along a forty-pound wet battery.
In 1899, the first advertisement for household electric oscillators appeared in the United States. In McClure's magazine, the oscillator is introduced as an appliance for treating headaches, wrinkles, and neuralgia (including hysteria). But doctors are still trying to convince patients to spend two or three dollars a visit to a clinic to be treated by giant "pelvic massage machines. One of these machines, known as a Chattanooga massager, has a five-foot-tall wheel on it.
In 1900-1920, with the widespread use of electricity, the plug-in home oscillator was one of the first home appliances to gain popularity throughout the United States. As a product marketed for women's health and relaxation, advertisements for oscillators were rife with puns, and a 1910 advertisement for vibrators even carried the headline "Vibration is Life.
In the 1930s, advertisements for vibrators disappeared from magazines and catalogs. As more and more pornographic movies showed women masturbating with vibrators, it became difficult for manufacturers to market them as a purely "massage" product. Merchants were branded as slutty, and the vibrator became infamous and soon disappeared from the market. It wasn't until 1965 that it reappeared on the market.
In 1968, wireless vibrators were introduced in Japan. After the introduction of the wireless vibrator, Hitachi Electric Company introduced the Hitachi Magic Wand. It later appeared in numerous Japanese adult films.
In 1998, the Rabbit vibrator won the HBO Mini Awards and became the new friend of shy Charlotte in the popular TV series "Sex and the City".
Today's vibrators come in a wide variety of shapes and functions to meet different needs, such as:
Sucking Vibrators
Licking Vibrators
Wearable Vibrators
Hopefully, there will be more quality vibrators in the future!

 

As early as 45 B.C., Cleopatra invented a primitive vibrator. She hollowed out the inside of the gourd and imprisoned a troop of bees inside. The bees danced around inside the gourd, turning it into a vibrator.
 
China's Ming Dynasty, when a popular sex toy called "Maine bell," which is shaped like a ball, hollow inside, containing mercury or other rolling items, outside wrapped in gold or silver. When the bell comes in contact with the body, it vibrates by itself.
It is somewhat similar to today's kegel balls.
During the Victorian era, many women suffered from "hysteria". Derived from the Greek word for "overactive womb," symptoms included anxiety, irritability, sexual fantasies, pelvic heaviness, and excessive vaginal discharge. Because this was the Victorian era, women were not considered to be in need of sex, so it was considered a disease.
Initially, in order to treat "female hysteria," doctors in the U.S. and England used "hydrotherapy massage," or jets of water to help patients release their "emotions.
Later, "manual pelvic massage" began to be used as a popular treatment. However, many severe patients had to undergo up to an hour of treatment before their symptoms subsided, causing many physicians to experience hand cramps.

 

In the 1850s, in order to free the hands of doctors, some visionaries invented the first mechanical vibrators. Some wise men invented the first generation of mechanical vibrators, which had an innovative hand-crank design. However, while the vibrator increased efficiency, it was still dependent on manual labor, and doctors still had to endure sore arms.

In 1869, a physician named George Taylor invented the Steam Vibrator. The vibrator consisted of a steam engine and a massage bed with a hole in the bed that served as a communication channel between the patient and the steam engine under the bed. Doctors didn't like the machine because they couldn't take it to patients' homes, and they hated shoveling coal into it.
In 1882, the first electronic oscillators were battery-operated massagers invented by English physician Joseph Mortimer Granville, configured with a toolbox similar to today's massagers, allowing physicians to treat hysteria with a variety of lengths and intensities of vibratory sensations.  Granville's electric vibrator was more portable, though. But in order to drive the machine, you still had to bring along a forty-pound wet battery.
In 1899, the first advertisement for household electric oscillators appeared in the United States. In McClure's magazine, the oscillator is introduced as an appliance for treating headaches, wrinkles, and neuralgia (including hysteria). But doctors are still trying to convince patients to spend two or three dollars a visit to a clinic to be treated by giant "pelvic massage machines. One of these machines, known as a Chattanooga massager, has a five-foot-tall wheel on it.
In 1900-1920, with the widespread use of electricity, the plug-in home oscillator was one of the first home appliances to gain popularity throughout the United States. As a product marketed for women's health and relaxation, advertisements for oscillators were rife with puns, and a 1910 advertisement for vibrators even carried the headline "Vibration is Life.
In the 1930s, advertisements for vibrators disappeared from magazines and catalogs. As more and more pornographic movies showed women masturbating with vibrators, it became difficult for manufacturers to market them as a purely "massage" product. Merchants were branded as slutty, and the vibrator became infamous and soon disappeared from the market. It wasn't until 1965 that it reappeared on the market.
In 1968, wireless vibrators were introduced in Japan. After the introduction of the wireless vibrator, Hitachi Electric Company introduced the Hitachi Magic Wand. It later appeared in numerous Japanese adult films.
In 1998, the Rabbit vibrator won the HBO Mini Awards and became the new friend of shy Charlotte in the popular TV series "Sex and the City".
Today's vibrators come in a wide variety of shapes and functions to meet different needs, such as:
Sucking Vibrators
Licking Vibrators
Wearable Vibrators
Hopefully, there will be more quality vibrators in the future!

 

2 thoughts onHistory of Sex Toys Ⅱ----Vibrators History of Sex Toys Ⅱ----Vibrators

  1. avatar paAjQohRJbtWd says:

    WDlVCEFftcPue

  2. avatar fqzpNCwyiaJutc says:

    RwkpPHqcDGxES

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

HEY YOU, SIGN UP AND CONNECT TO ACVIOO! HEY YOU, SIGN UP AND CONNECT TO ACVIOO!

Be the first to learn about our latest trends and get exclusive offers Be the first to learn about our latest trends and get exclusive offers

Will be used in accordance with our Privacy Policy

Will be used in accordance with our Privacy Policy

Scroll To Top

#title#

#price#
×